Chet Atkins

Chester Burton Atkins (June 20, 1924 – June 30, 2001), known as “Mr. Guitar” and “The Country Gentleman”, was an American musician, occasional vocalist, songwriter, and record producer, who along with Owen Bradley and Bob Ferguson, among others, created the country music style that came to be known as the Nashville sound, which expanded country music’s appeal to adult pop music fans. He was primarily known as a guitarist. He also played the mandolin, fiddle, banjo, and ukulele.

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Narvel Felts

Narvel Felts (born November 11, 1938 in Keiser, Arkansas) is an American country music, rockabilly singer. Raised in Bernie, Missouri where he attended Bernie High School, Felts was discovered during a talent show at the school. He had been encouraged to participate in the show by some of his classmates, and it just so happened that a talent agent was attending the performance at the time. Felts recorded his first single “Kiss-a Me Baby” at the age of 16, and his career skyrocketed with the help of Roy Orbison and Johnny Cash. Narvel Felts enjoyed modest pop success in 1960 with a remake of the Drifters “Honey Love” which earned a low position on the Billboard Hot 100. He went on to release such songs as “Lonely Teardrops” and “Pink And Black Days”, but it wasn’t until the 1970s when he began enjoying success on a national level as a country singer.

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Ray Campi

Ray Campi was born in Yonkers, New York. After his family moved to Austin, Texas in 1944, Campi began a lifetime of performing and recording music in numerous American genres, including folk, country, and rock and roll as well as rockabilly. Early on he recorded on Domino Records. In the 1950s Ray Campi recorded for several labels, including Dot Records, and recorded the first tribute record to the 1959 Buddy Holly plane crash, ‘The Ballad of Donna and Peggy Sue’, backed by the Big Bopper’s band. He also worked with many of the most prominent pioneers of rock and roll music, including Bill Haley, Buddy Holly, and Gene Vincent.

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The Cochran Brothers

Hank Cochran and Eddie Cochran, not related, both rose to international prominence in music – Hank Cochran in Country Music and Eddie Cochran in Rock and Roll. Their success as solo artists did not come overnight, though. Before that, Hank and Eddie joined forces in 1954 when they were only teenagers, Hank 19 and Eddie 16, but as the Cochran Brothers they made their very first professional steps in music. And they did so with some success; the Cochran Brothers recorded professionally for EKKO and CASH RECORDS, toured extensively along the west coast and were featured regularly on regional TV with the popular artists of the day.

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George Jones

George Glenn Jones (September 12, 1931 – April 26, 2013) was an American musician, singer and songwriter. He achieved international fame for his long list of hit records, including his best known song “He Stopped Loving Her Today”, as well as his distinctive voice and phrasing. For the last 20 years of his life, Jones was frequently referred to as the greatest living country singer.

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Huelyn Duvall

Duvall is known for his 1950’s recordings such as Little Boy Blue, Boom Boom Baby, Double Talkin’ Baby, among others. He has performed with Eddie Cochran, Johnny Horton, Bobby Darin, Dale Hawkins, The Champs, and others. His Little Boy Blue charted on Billboard in 1958 and Eddie Cochran told him it was one of his favourite songs. Duvall recorded Boom Boom Baby two years prior to Billy “Crash” Craddock and his version of Double Talkin’ Baby was sent to Gene Vincent as well as Modern Romance to Sanford Clark.

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Bill Monroe

William Smith Monroe (September 13, 1911 – September 9, 1996) was an American mandolinist, singer, and songwriter who created the style of music known as bluegrass. The genre takes its name from his band, the Blue Grass Boys, named for Monroe’s home state of Kentucky. Monroe’s performing career spanned 69 years as a singer, instrumentalist, composer and bandleader. He is often referred to as the Father of Bluegrass.

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Cab Calloway

Cabell “Cab” Calloway III (December 25, 1907 – November 18, 1994) was an American jazz singer and bandleader. He was strongly associated with the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City, where he was a regular performer. Calloway was a master of energetic scat singing and led one of the United States’ most popular big bands from the start of the 1930s to the late 1940s. Calloway’s band featured performers including trumpeters Dizzy Gillespie and Adolphus “Doc” Cheatham, saxophonists Ben Webster and Leon “Chu” Berry, New Orleans guitar ace Danny Barker, and bassist Milt Hinton. Calloway continued to perform until his death in 1994 at the age of 86.

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Frankie Miller

Texas honky-tonk singer Frankie Miller enjoyed a string of hits for STARDAY in the ’50s and ’60s. Nearly a decade before those classic recordings, Frankie was drafted into the Army. He gave up a blossoming music career and went off to fight in Korea. Frankie bought a guitar while on leave in Seoul and taped a letter for the folks back in Texas, singing samples of the latest songs he had written while far from home. Over sixty years later, that tape was found and made its way to this historic LP!

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Billy Mize

Billy Mize (Born William Robert Mize on April 29, 1929 in Arkansas City, Kansas) is a steel guitarist, band leader, vocalist, songwriter, and TV show host. Mize was raised in the San Joaquin Valley of California, an area steeped in country music thanks to relocated Okies. He originally learned to play guitar as a child, but fell in love with the steel guitar he received for his 18th birthday.

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Alexis Korner

Alexis Korner (born Alexis Andrew Nicholas Koerner; 19 April 1928 – 1 January 1984) was a British blues musician and radio broadcaster, who has sometimes been referred to as “a founding father of British blues”. A major influence on the sound of the British music scene in the 1960s, Korner was instrumental in bringing together various English blues musicians.

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Tony Sheridan

Tony Sheridan (Anthony Esmond Sheridan McGinnity; 21 May 1940 – 16 February 2013) was an English rock and roll singer-songwriter and guitarist. He was best known as an early collaborator of the Beatles (though the record was labelled as being with “The Beat Brothers”), one of two non-Beatles (the other being Billy Preston) to receive label performance credit on a record with the group, and the only non-Beatle to appear as lead singer on a Beatles recording which charted as a single.

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Steve Baker

Steve Baker is one of today’s most influential harp players and an integral part of the modern harmonica scene. He was born and raised in London, England and now lives near Hamburg, Germany, where he first came in the late 1970s with the Anglo-American jugband “Have Mercy”.

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